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Change of circumstances

You or your surviving spouse or partner must let us know straight away if your personal details, bank details or circumstances change.

Name change

If you change your name:

  • by deed poll - we need to see a copy of it before we can update your record
  • because you get married or remarried - we need to see a copy of the marriage certificate
  • because you get divorced or dissolve a civil partnership - we need to see a copy of the Decree Absolute
  • because you’re using a previous surname - we need to see a copy of your birth certificate

Change of address or bank details

To let us know you have changed your address or bank details contact us.

You can also complete and return a change of address and bank details form (PDF: 168KB).

To redirect your pension to another bank account, you must contact us.

Overseas payments

If you decide you want your pension to be paid into an overseas bank account, read our bank payments overseas factsheet (PDF: 68.4KB) and complete the TAPS Mandate form for the country you’re moving to.

Incorrect date of birth

If we hold an incorrect date of birth for you then before we can update your record we need to see a copy of either your:

  • birth certificate
  • photo driving licence
  • passport

Adult dependant’s pension and re-marriage or cohabiting

If your Scheme membership ended before 1 April 2008

Your surviving spouse or partner will receive an adult dependant’s pension as long as they are not remarried or living with another person.

If they remarry or live with another person they must let us know, as the pension will have to be stopped.

If they don’t let us know then an overpayment may happen.

All overpayments must be repaid.

     

    Scheme membership on 1 April 2008 and beyond

    An adult dependant’s pension is payable for life regardless of if your surviving spouse or partner chooses to remarry or live with another person.

    For details about adult dependant’s pensions payable from each Section or Scheme read the Survivors Guide (PDF: 449KB).

    Power of attorney and letters of authority

    If you are not able to manage your own affairs you can nominate someone to act on your behalf. You must confirm this by sending us either a:

    • notarised Power of Attorney
    • Court of Protection order
    • Letter of Authority

    You can get these from a solicitor.

    They must be signed and dated by you and by the person or people you’ve nominated to act on your behalf.

    The Court of Protection has to be granted by the court (Public Office of the Guardian) and only when medical evidence has been provided to prove you are not able to manage your own affairs.

    If you need someone to deal with your mail because you're unwell or are going abroad, you must send us a Letter of Authority to keep on your record.

    The Letter of Authority must be signed and dated by you and by the person or people you’re asking to deal with your personal mail. In the Letter of Authority, list what you want them to receive on your behalf. 

    You must make it clear that you give permission for them to contact us on your behalf and permission for us to contact them.